Muriel McKay murder case may hold key to clearing Kris Maharaj

The-Times-1-350×210

Muriel McKay murder case may hold key to clearing Kris Maharaj

Muriel McKay murder case may hold key to clearing Kris Maharaj

A British businessman who has been held in an American jail for 35 years believes a breakthrough in a notorious murder case could hold the key to his release.

By Ben Ellery

Published: 12th January 2022

A British businessman who has been held in an American jail for 35 years believes a breakthrough in a notorious murder case could hold the key to his release.

Kris Maharaj, 82, was put on death row in 1987 after being convicted of murdering the father and son businessmen Derrick and Duane Moo Young in Florida.

Clive Stafford Smith, one of Britain’s leading human rights lawyers who has represented Maharaj for the past 28 years, believes the murder of Muriel McKay, at a Hertfordshire farm in 1969, is connected to his case.

Last month The Times revealed the man convicted of McKay’s murder had confessed to where her body was buried.

Police are facing pressure from the McKay family to excavate the site and recover her remains after a confession by Nizamodeen Hosein, 75.

McKay, 55, was the victim of a bungled kidnapping by Nizamodeen and his brother Arthur after they mistook her for the wife of Rupert Murdoch.

A third brother, Adam, was suspected as being the mastermind of the kidnapping but had an alibi.

However, Stafford Smith said that while investigating Maharaj’s case, a woman at the Trinidad home of the Hoseins’ mother told him that Adam was “behind the trouble the other boys got into in London”.

After his brothers’ conviction, Adam Hosein left the UK and in the 1980s became part of a narcotics conspiracy that reached all the way up to Pablo Escobar, Stafford Smith claims.

He has written to Priti Patel, the home secretary, asking for the release of sealed court documents in relation to the case of McKay that he believes will prove Adam Hosein was at the scene when the Moo Youngs were killed. They were murdered in 1986 in a room at the DuPont Plaza Hotel, in Miami.

Maharaj was convicted after prosecutors claimed he met the Moo Youngs at the hotel to demand they repay money they had taken from him.

Half a dozen cartel conspirators have already admitted it was a cartel hit and Maharaj was not involved.

Stafford Smith said: “Truth is a lot stranger than fiction, and it is bizarre that a 1969 murder case from London could have held the key to exonerating Kris Maharaj for another crime 17 years later, 4,400 miles away in Miami.”